Posts Tagged ‘time’

Run The Rock: Short On Training Time

This past week has been a bit hectic, although that is no excuse for slacking. I am now only two months out from my first half marathon and missed almost an entire week of running. Fortunately, the time restraints that have kept me from putting in mileage have not kept me from training all together. Instead I fell back on a training technique that I tested in a previous weeks endeavor.

Early this past week I realized that life was getting in the way of my normal training. Without enough time to workout all at once I had to get some training in. This was a subtle reminder of a previous endeavor where I did one workout per hour for an entire week. This would be a great way to continue my training even though I didn’t have enough free time to go running.

With this plan I was able to accumulate 30-45 minutes a day of exercise without having that much time to set aside. It allowed me to take advantage of less than 5 minutes free time at work, or a few minutes before I jumped into the shower. As I noted in the wrap up for One Workout Per Hour, this was a great way to exercise everyday without having to commit a one hour block to a workout. Unfortunately I don’t believe that it was the most productive week considering that none of it was cardio based, but it was certainly better than missing the week all together.

On a side note, I have noticed that my overall sports performance has greatly increased since I have began training. My bowling average has increase from a 190 to a 201 in the past month alone, and I have added at least 40 feet to my disc golf drives. I believe that this is due to an overall increase in activity level and muscular control.

Do you think that sport specific training in one area can have such an effect on other sports?

Run The Rock: Better Breathing

High school cross country practice was almost exclusively running with a small amount of weight training. Distance days we learned the layout of the city, running the streets around town to put in mileage. Speed work was always done on the track, mostly in the form of 800 or 400 repeats. If you want to build speed an endurance then you should work on running fast and far right? After six years of cross country I certainly didn’t know any better, but as it turns out running isn’t the only way to a faster race time.

One thing that was never taken into account when I was trained to run was technique, specifically when it comes to breathing. What is the most energy efficient way to breathe while running? What should I be doing to provide my body with the most fresh oxygen in every breath? These are the questions that occurred to me the other day, and I found the answer… one answer any way. HowToRunAMarathon.net provided me with an article called ‘Belly Breathing‘ that I decided to put to the test.

Wednesday evening I set out on a short run to train for a half marathon and practice this new breathing strategy. Half of a mile into my run, I had just broken a sweat and settled into a comfortable pace, I turned my attention to my breathing. Shallow and harsh,┬áin and out through my gaping mouth. I don’t know how I was getting enough oxygen to stay conscious much less active.

Taking advice from the article I began forcing air out of my lungs by tightening my stomach muscles as I exhaled. This required constant focus specifically on breathing. Gasping for air when my lungs were at capacity I would realize that I had quit belly breathing and would again have to focus. As the next few miles passed beneath my feet it took less concentration, and even became comfortable. The same pace seemed much less demanding and I was able to breath strictly through my nose for the first time. With only one run of practice belly breathing is a method that I intend to adopt permanently. In addition to the increased endurance that I am sure will result, the effectiveness of this technique has inspired me to work on my form in the near future.

Do any runners know where I could find running technique suggestions?